1. Cosplay, 1930s-1950s version.

  2. Who is the Murderer? by Panchkori Dey, a pulp detective romance published in India in 1903. If you read Urdu you can read the whole thing here, courtesy of the World Digital Library.

    Who is the Murderer? by Panchkori Dey, a pulp detective romance published in India in 1903. If you read Urdu you can read the whole thing here, courtesy of the World Digital Library.

  3. Contemporary illustration of Helen Wilder, special policewoman on the Honolulu police department, 1899. Yes, she rode a horse regularly on the job. Yes, she carried and used her revolver. Yes, she wore her badge on her hat. And, yes, she marched into ships by herself and arrested sailors and captains who mistreated women and children. Helen Wilder was a genuine bad ass.

    Contemporary illustration of Helen Wilder, special policewoman on the Honolulu police department, 1899. Yes, she rode a horse regularly on the job. Yes, she carried and used her revolver. Yes, she wore her badge on her hat. And, yes, she marched into ships by herself and arrested sailors and captains who mistreated women and children. Helen Wilder was a genuine bad ass.

  4. Thomas Carlyle, on health care

    From Past and Present (1843)

    One of Dr. Allison’s Scotch facts struck us much. A poor Irish Widow, her husband having died in one of the Lanes of Edinburgh, went forth with her three children, bare of all resource, to solicit help from the Charitable Establishments of that City. At this Charitable Establishment and then at that she was refused; referred from one to the other, helped by none; — till she had exhausted them all; till her strength and heart failed her: she sank down in typhus fever; died, and infected her Lane with fever, so that ‘seventeen other persons’ died of fever there in consequence. The humane Physician asks thereupon, as with a heart too full for speaking, Would it not have been economy to help this poor Widow?

  5. Beerjacking tactics of the Great Depression.

    Beerjacking tactics of the Great Depression.

  6. The cover for my roleplaying game (well, rpg supplement, really), now on sale in pdf or print form.

    The cover for my roleplaying game (well, rpg supplement, really), now on sale in pdf or print form.

  7. From Susan Mann’s “Women in China’s Long Eighteenth Century”

    In this context, married couples were not expected to be intimate, and often they spent little time together. Indeed, a Chinese mother was likely to view a son’s attraction to his wife as a threat to her own claim on his affection, or, at the very least, as a source of distraction from the work her daughter-in-law was supposed to do for her. In elite families, husbands worked “outside” the home as scholars or officials or businessmen, which meant regular extended periods of travel to examinations or extended sojourning in teaching positions, official posts, or trade centers far from home. The husband’s absence required a bride to forge her primary ties with her mother-in-law and with the other women in her husband’s family, with whom she would spend most of her time. In this context, fantasies about marital intimacy represented not some romantic ideal of domesticity but resistance to the disciplines of Confucian patriarchy.

  8. Graphic of the process by which illness is shamanically banished into effigies in Mongolia.

    Graphic of the process by which illness is shamanically banished into effigies in Mongolia.

  9. Nick Carter, in “Zanabayah, the Terrible, or, Nick Carter’s Struggle With the Vitic King”

    A little Friday reading for you, from a 1907 dime novel.

    For those of you unfamiliar with Nick Carter, he was the archetypal detective figure in American popular culture for about thirty five years. He appeared in around 5000 stories, gave the world the first major supervillain in Dr. Jack Quartz (years before Arthur Conan Doyle created Professor Moriarty), and provided the model for Doc Savage, Superman, and Batman.

    He was important, is what I’m saying.

    The prose is dated, of course, but it’s still entertaining (I think so, anyhow) and stands as a good example of the dime novels at their peak.

    "Zanabayah, the Terrible, or, Nick Carter’s Struggle With the Vitic King"